The Grandeur of the Acropolis

IMG_0223
Columns of the Parthenon, which was built in the 5th century BC.

The Acropolis, perched on a rocky hilltop above the bustle of Athens, is one of the grandest historical sites that I have had to opportunity to visit.   I’m sharing a few photos from my 2012 visit in response to the Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand.  If you have never had the opportunity to experience the grandeur of the Acropolis, you can take a virtual tour here.  Happy Sunday!

IMG_0221
View of the Acropolis from the Temple of Olympian Zeus. Construction on this temple began in the 6th century BC.
IMG_0207
The porch of the Caryatids on the south side of the Erechtheion.

 

IMG_0211
The Sacred Olive Tree on the north side of the Erechteion.  It is said to be a descendant of the olive tree that Athena gave to the ancient Greeks, causing them to name their city “Athens” in her honor.  Every invader has cut it down, but every time someone has saved a sprig to replant later.
Advertisements

11 thoughts on “The Grandeur of the Acropolis

    1. Tina, I hope you can visit! These pictures certainly don’t do justice to the sense of history that you get when you walk around the Acropolis! It was rainy the day I visited last year and there were very few other people. I hope to go back with my family some day. Thanks for your comment! Jennifer

      Like

  1. Pingback: Photo Project “52 Bolivian Sundays” ['Grand'] | 3rdculturechildren

    1. Wouldn’t it be great if we could see it then? It has undergone so much damage over the years under various occupations, but it is still so beautiful. It’s hard to imagine how impressive it was more than 2000 years ago! Thanks for your comment! Jennifer

      Like

  2. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand (1) | Through the Eye of Bastet

  3. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challange: Grand | Words 'n Pics

  4. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge – Grand | Joe's Musings

Everyone has the right to an opinion and I'd love to hear yours! While comments are very welcome, they will be moderated. My kids read this blog, too!

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s