The Beauty of Teens

Photo credit to my son Sevrin
Photo taken by (and used with permission from) my son Sevrin at his high school sailing team practice.

As I write this, there are seven teens asleep in my basement.  My son and his friends came back from their high school dance in high spirits last night. Laughing and joking loudly, they boisterously descended on my kitchen, devouring everything within reach (even some chips that I thought I had hidden pretty well).  These guys were the human equivalent of an invading colony of army ants, foraging insatiably through my refrigerator.

Now these boy-men are dead to the world, asleep in a puppy pile on my basement floor.  And I have to be honest – I am loving every single thing about these teens.   In fifteen plus years of parenthood, I have grown accustomed to – perhaps, in some ways, inured to – the many and diverse aspects of wonder in babies and children.  But I find myself surprised and overjoyed at the sheer beauty of teenagers today.

My friend Doug describes my feelings perfectly:

I continue to be dumbfounded, flummoxed, and gobsmacked by my kids, in all sorts of great ways.

The conventional wisdom is that teens are “challenging”.  And, no question about it, there are challenging aspects of parenting teens.  But I think teens get a bit of a bad rap in our society. I know I’ve had many people say to me over the years, as I struggled with sleep deprivation, no “me” time, etc. etc.:

 “Just WAIT until you have teens!”

But now I am starting to wonder. I wonder if it could be possible that I was misinterpreting these statements for all these years?   Instead of a dire warning of impending misery (based perhaps on my then-existent sleep deprived misery coupled with a tired, old societal cliche), is it possible that what they actually were trying to say to me was:

“Hang in there, it WILL get better! Teenagers are the BEST!

Because now that my oldest son is 15 and a freshman in high school, I am finding that this stage of parenting is a comparative cakewalk.   Here are a few reasons why:

Teens have the capacity for So! Much! Joy! The photo above, which my son took of his high school sailing teammates at practice last fall, illustrates what I mean. Teens can make anything fun.  Sure, there are pretty major hormonal changes and brain development going on that help explain this facet of teen behavior. But I also think that teens are just not afraid to show it when they are having fun.  Somewhere along the way, most adults seem to lose the capacity for emotion that they had as teens.  We keep it in, stuff it down, don’t laugh out loud. Living with a teenager is a good reminder that sometimes you just need to turn up the music and dance around wildly.

You can reason with them.  This will come as a pleasant surprise to parents who have spent more than a decade living with toddlers and young children.  And I say this as a mother who freely admits to having resorted to Tootsie Pop bribery – believe me, one day your child will in fact become a rationale human being.  Stuck in a situation that he would (no doubt) have preferred NOT to be in recently, my teen son summed it up like this:

“I understand what you are saying. I understand why I should do this. I’m just frustrated, that’s all.”

Then he sucked it up and did what he had to do for his family.

The social relationships of today’s teen reflects a lot more equality. My son is friends with both girls and boys.  Heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual.  I don’t know about transgender yet but I have no doubt that he wouldn’t give a rip.  My teen and those he hangs out with just don’t seem to care that much.  This is a huge step forward from when I was a teen myself.   Sure, there is still plenty of drama.  But things seem to be, somehow, just a little bit less – fraught. And so much more accepting. I would be lying if I didn’t tell you that I think that is totally great.

Teens can contribute.  Carrying in groceries, washing dishes, shoveling snow – it struck me recently that my teen son is doing a lot to help keep the wheels of of our unwieldy family of of five moving forward. This is huge! A total sea change from the days of constant care and feeding of babies and small children when the parents are always, always DOING for the kids.  Sure, you often have to remind a teen to do a chore.  But if you give them the challenge of responsibility, by and large, they will accept it.

They expose you to new – and sometimes wonderful – things.  My son introduced me to Avicii way before his music made it to the mainstream; that was just the beginning of the new music he has exposed me to.  The other day, I was doing laundry and I heard him in his room playing his guitar and singing “The Man Who Can’t Be Moved”.   I had never heard of The Script or this song before.  But before suddenly,  I was loading the dryer with tears in my eyes.

But it’s not just music. My teen curates movie and program selections us (his lame parents) based on our tastes. His recent recommendation of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia to his dad was spot on.   I’m sure I would never have even heard about the growing popularity of eSports if not for the influence of my teen, who competes for his high school Starleague  team.   I’ve also learned several iPhone tricks that I would never have figured out on my own.  And, by the way, my in-house teen tech support can’t be beat!

Teens are more connected to the global community.  My son, who plays eSports, routinely chats online with teens in other countries.  Thanks to his fantasy geopolitics team, he knows much more about what is going on in Iran and Ukraine than I do.  Part of this is without question due to changes in global society and technology that have made our world smaller and more interconnected for all of us.   But I think this increased connection across borders can only be good for the future of our planet, particularly when it comes to solving big problems (like, say,  human rights abuses.) I am hopeful that this is the generation that begins to truly live out Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s words: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.”

Teens know how to find the information they need. Today’s teens came of age in the era of Google – they know how to use a search engine.  But I am referring to more than just their search skills.  What I mean is that this is a generation that has a unique attitude towards information as being infinitely accessible and independently attainable.  Information is easily and immediately obtained, disputes are easily settled.  Pearl Harbor happened on Dec. 7, 1940 or 41? (1941) Pizza dough is two weeks old and slightly gray? (edible) Who wrote the Art of War? (Sun Tze) What are the requirements for an out-of-state resident to get a driver’s license in New Hampshire? (this one for my nephew Eli, another great teen.) In a sense, this attitude makes them a generation of empowered autodidacts.

Teenagers are downright hilarious.  My son, his friends, and the other teens in my life crack me up.  They make me laugh all the time.  They have mastered puns; they have evolved into excellent purveyors of sarcasm. They get (and make) jokes that reference popular culture  – even when the popular culture being referenced occurred well before they were born.  (For example, they totally got it when I described them during their kitchen rampage as “Gremlins who had been doused in water and fed after midnight”.)

And they can be so very creative in their humor!  For their vocabulary homework for Spanish class, my son and his friends made this video.  The assignment was not to make a video; the assignment was to come up with a dialogue that involved specific Spanish vocabulary. But remember my point about how teens can make anything fun?

Teens give you the gift of revisiting things that you’ve done before – but with a new perspective.  Here’s just one example: If I didn’t live with a teen, I may never have gone back and re-read books that I read in high school.  Classics – books like The Giver, Of Mice and Men, and To Kill A Mockingbird – where  I fully recall the plot and the major characters but not the details.  The author’s tone, poignant quotes, turns of phrase that knock your socks off.  All the things that really make these books classics? These I had forgotten.  I was surprised to discover how much my perspective has changed on some of these books, my opinions shifting and resettling after years of life experience.  I empathize with some characters that I used to have nothing but disdain for; I’ve lost patience with others that I used to love.  When my son gets a new reading assignment, I now see it as an opportunity.  I started re-reading Romeo & Juliet because my son, describing the priceless hilarity of his teacher reading 500-year-old bawdy humor out loud to the class, reminded me that “Shakespeare was a BOSS!”

Although not yet fully formed, you can see in a teen glimmers of the person that he or she will become.  Teens today have opinions and they speak up for themselves. (My son has even shared his opinion on this blog before.)  They are not afraid to like something just because the LIKE it, even it it is not the current thing.  I was surprised that one of the first songs my son taught himself on guitar was Semisonic’s Closing Time – from 1998, the year before he was born.

Perhaps because they are more open and expressive than previous generations have been, you can catch glimpses of today’s teens’ developing inner selves.  Between this and his external behavior, I feel like I can truly see the proto-adult that is growing in my adolescent son – and I really, REALLY like him.  The guy who stays cool in a pinch.  The guy who doesn’t hold a grudge. The guy who can be counted on to be there for his friends.  The guy who always walks the girl home at night (for safety reasons).  I look forward to watching him grow into the wonderful adult that I can now say that I feel sure he will become.

My middle son turns 13 in two weeks.

With him, I’m looking forward to discovering the beauty of teens all over again.

Closing time
Open all the doors and let you out into the world

Closing time
Every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end

Yeah.

Advertisements

245 thoughts on “The Beauty of Teens

    1. I wanted to say that this is astounding. I am, in fact, a teen myself. normally I don’t like much, less read blogs or comments, about teen because I find them superficial or just down right fake. As I was reading this though, I really thought that you captured the essence of teenagers. I’m especially happy that you didn’t insult us teen, rather you made us sound like we were capable of anything. Thank you for writing this, and making teens everywhere feel loved.

      Liked by 3 people

  1. I couldn’t agree more! My boys are just past the teenage years. To my great surprise, one of my favourite things was listening to their conversations as I ferried them and their team mates to and from sports events. (They were not permitted to drive themselves – school rule). As an older friend of mine says, “teenaged boys are very democratic” :).

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Yes! I also love listening in to their conversations while driving the soccer and hockey carpools. Teen boys ARE democratic and also fairly good at equitably solving problems. I wonder how long it will take for the societal perceptions to change. Thanks for your comment – I hope you and your family are well and that you are enjoying the next stage of the mother-son relationship.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Rashi.Revived

    A great new perspective, different from how teens are generally perceived. It’s great to know that some parents do take an open-minded and non-stereotypical parenting stance with their children 🙂

    Liked by 7 people

    1. That’s really kind of you to say! He’s a great kid (as are his siblings, who are each very different from one another). I suppose my husband and I do deserve some credit, even though we feel that we are just figuring out each stage of parenthood on the fly. But really I am seeing these positive traits in my friends’ teens and my son’s friends as well. That’s why I think of this post as a love letter to my son and his entire generation. Thank you so much for your comment!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Wow so so so awesome! Thank you for sharing and renewing hope and also confidence in my own daughter, who just turned 10. I always worry but I think if you stay involved and connected with your child that is the key.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. How refreshing this was to read. As a high school teacher I see a lot of frustrated teens and teachers just trying to get through the day or the period and that can be very discouraging. There are always good and bad in any situation but I love that you remind us of the good things teens are brimming with. Thanks

    Liked by 8 people

    1. First of all, I can’t say thank you enough to you for being a teacher. I can’t think of a more important job. I lived in Norway in college, where teachers are financially rewarded and respected as professionals, and it totally opened my eyes. These days, I can’t even volunteer in my kids’ classrooms without having to go home and take an ibuprofen and a nap! Second, I think my experience with human rights causes me to analyze the bad stuff but to simultaneously look for the good things, the slow but steady progress. I think that has impacted my approach to parenting as well. So thanks again for you comment and for your role in the lives of teens!

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Nothing but agreement from me, even now at 21 my relationship with my daughter, who now lives in her own apartment near her university, keep me fresh up-to-date and feeling challenged to grow. In addition she is still my best friend. Loving our children gives us the opportunity to improve the world with each generation in a more profound way than any other option can offer.

    Liked by 8 people

  6. Wow. What a great post!!! Really insightful and you’re right. Teens in our society do get a bad rap. All of the teens I know, regardless of race or religion, are stand up human beings that I really enjoy being around. Now, their taste in music on the other hand… ;o)

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thanks so much! I think you nailed it with the sentence “All of the teens I know, regardless of race or religion, are stand up human beings that I really enjoy being around.” As for musical taste, I heard my son playing “Sweet Home Alabama” on the guitar and I was appalled. I HATE that song. But then he explained that he is open to all kinds of music; he just asks everyone he knows what songs they like and then checks them out. I kind of have to respect that. Thank you very much for your comment – it’s much appreciated!

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Looking for some humanity. Did anyone ever tell you they can hear your voice when they read your blog/stories? This is the first WP story/ WP blog I have ever read. I’m so glad I don’t watch much t.v. And can relate to most of the books you have read. The only song I know is Closing Time… I’ll have to look up the other artists! Seems to me all parenting styles are different, love also is very unique to parent/ child respectively. I think this empowered individual has long been a teacher in your life and you recognize his stages as milestones, for him and you. This new world order is evolving into deep connections made with joy, these tools are infinite and do they know? Within the chaos that is churning, just beneath the surface, yells boy men and girl women: “WHATS NEXT???”
    Sounds like we can all appreciate the energy, ingenuity and passion- in the picture(!!) and your story! Thank you🌀

    Liked by 6 people

  8. Thanks for a great post – as a high school teacher I always looked forward to the day my own kids were teenagers, and they didn’t disappoint. I’ve so enjoyed watching them mature into an amazing young man and woman. Now at 17 & 19, I only have a few more teen years, but I’ve loved every minute of them – well, almost – my son’s junior year was a little rough! I agree that this generation of teens is one of the kindest, most openhearted generations ever, and like you, I love ’em.

    Liked by 6 people

  9. Such a lovely post, and so nice hear a positive story about teenagers for a change as opposed to all the negativity they regularly cop in the press. As a parent of two young children, it’s encouraging to know that it does (maybe?) get easier!

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Elinor, I think that is exactly the attitude that will ensure that you WON’T have to lose them. In some ways, I feel like this is a post to myself a few years ago. But there is one thing that I didn’t include but feel compelled to share with you as a mom. I learned this from a co-worker with 3 sons – fill one cupboard with less expensive snacks (chips & salsa, lemonade mix, hummus/pita, anything on sale, etc.) and label it FOOD FOR FRIENDS. I don’t know why I thought my sons would be different, but they are not. So this will be the new regime in these parts. Best wishes to you and your family!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thank you!
        Great idea with the separate friend night food. Feel like they are starting to eat us out of the house already!
        And I do admire you for having them all over at night! The mess. The stinkyness… I’ll have to prepare my self for all that too 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  10. Brilliant! Love this, so well written and agree with every word as I giggle at my teens and their friends antics. Putting it in words makes it so special, and I appreciate them even more, between the drama’s and the hormones😀. I think it is so important that we join in as parents and laugh and be silly with them because that’s why they feel comfortable and open up to you. Well said!

    Liked by 5 people

  11. stefaniflippingpages

    Reblogged this on stefaniflippingpages and commented:
    I am lucky enough to hear great exemplary moms and dads told their parenting stories at my workplace. Reading this I think I should share so more people may be inspired by the beautiful thoughts written inside 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

  12. Love this beautiful post. As the mother of two teen boys 13 and 15, I too cherish these fleeting moments. I try every day to live in the moment whether joyous or trying. I am always struck when I look at their often awkward and changing bodies to still spy the face of a young boy as they punch and wrestle with their friends…And as I drive to the market for the third time this week to replace the gallon of milk that was drained yesterday, I am painfully aware of how in just a few years the playroom will fall silent.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thanks very much for your kind words. Every stage of parenthood has its highlights and challenges – you would think I would have figured out by now that I would each new phase holds surprises and delights. Maybe what makes this teen thing different is that I am realizing that I am no longer living with a tiny person or a young person. My son is becoming a “real” person, aka the person he will be for the rest of his life. Witnessing that is pretty great. Wishing you and your kids all the best!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Thank you this is exactly what I needed to read! My son is 14 and my youngest will turn 13 in May… there are challenges as you’ve mentioned but I’m loving this new world of teen parenting and your post helped me to realize I’m not crazy for enjoying this season with children (as some parents of teens have said) I’m just embracing my role as a mom!
    Blessings, Danielle

    Liked by 5 people

    1. You may not be a parent, but I think that you definitely do have kids! Teachers play such an important role in the lives of our young people every day. And if you read through this comment thread, I think you’ll see some of the teens acknowledging that impact. Thank you for all that you are doing for the next generation!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Nice to meet you and thank you for your comment! From your blog, it looks like your plan is to be a lawyer? I applaud you for that – you got this! My advice is to think about what kind of law you want to practice. The lawyers who have the greatest job satisfaction in the long term are the ones who have an area of expertise. Take as many clinics and do as many internships as you can. Knowledge is power! Good luck!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hmm, I don’t know if that actually makes me a cool mom. We live in Minneapolis, so have been Semisonic fans since way back when they were Trip Shakespeare! But maybe the fact that my teen still likes my music DOES make me a cool mom? In any event, I truly appreciate your comment. Thank you!

      Like

  14. Gary Dean Holdaway

    This is a lovely post! Make the most of your teens, it seems like just yesterday I was his age- but it was nine years ago! NINE whole years- I’m married! I have a three year old daughter that converses with me about her toddler philosophies! Teens drift by so fast 😦 and you’re right, it’s a beautiful time of life, and those years do shape you.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Toddler philosophies are the BEST! Enjoy! But isn’t it weird how clear the memories of being a teen still are? Sometimes I think that helps to bridge the distance. The generations seem closer now than they did back when I was a teen. Best to you and yours, Gary!

      Like

    1. Thank you, Mr. Brick! There is no question that my kids are FAR from perfect; somewhere in the archives is a post about the time we got kicked out of the Nobel Peace Prize Center because they were fighting. But I do love them, and I very much appreciate your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Charu Chhitwal

    Thank you for writing this because you are right I say that enough and more times when my 3 year old is being naughty and stubborn ‘wait till she is a teenager’. Thanks for this article

    Liked by 3 people

  16. This was amazing it read, thank you for posting. I’ve noticed lately that i have been thinking negatively towards teenagaers now that I’m about to graduate college but this is a great reminder to always keep an open mind and not be quick to judge. I am excited for to see what teenagers will show us. I can’t wait to see what my 2 year old nephew will be like when becomes a teenager.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I think that those are words that we should all live by: “always keep an open mind and not be quick to judge.” Thank your for that. Enjoy your nephew – being an aunt is one of the very best relationships there is! Good luck as you finish college. “Every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end” – those Closing Time lyrics apply to you, too! 🙂 (Check out the video on YouTube if you don’t know that song.)

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Love this. Teenagers get an undeserved bad rap. I have 2 teenage girls (18 &16) that don’t do any of things people say teens do. Well they do eat a lot. They are funny, respectful and just all around great young women. Not only them but I see that in their friends too. Great post.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Well said! I actually have no problem with how much they eat – they are growing so much. I can literally see it in my middle son. He gets up in the morning and the pants he wore yesterday are now highwater. But I agree that it is not just my kids – I see this in all the kids they hang out with. Thank you for confirming that I’m not alone!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. johnberk

    It is great to read something in defense of the younger generations, instead of the classic mumbling about a lack of education. Your list proves that there is a hope for the future. We become less separated and learn how to share ideas, never mind if they come from a completely different person. For me, my son is a source of inspiration and also help. He shows me the newest gadgets, and talks with me about my business. Sooner or later, he will have to take over, so I try to engage with him in fruitful discussions about serious topics, and he is able to catch up. He somehow learned more than I did at his age. This is awesome.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thanks for your thoughtful comment. My oldest son (the one in this post) has started working with his dad, too. It’s so great to see them bouncing ideas off each other – even if I don’t understand what they are talking about half the time. Best to you and your family, John!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. As a teenager, I loved this post so much! So often teens are portrayed in a negative light in media, but all of the things you said in this post and completely true. And, for the record; I am also the in house tech support, and i love it 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  20. I live in the UK and I feel like American teens are SO OPEN. I mean here, we wouldn’t make a video like that – we’d do the bare minimum. I love the sense of freedom you guys have, and I’m 18 but it feels like sometimes I’m open and some of my friends are not. A downside is focusing on celebrity culture because some use their time for that and not for learning. I’m glad there’s a mother like you that understands the greatness and the mindset of being a teen 😀

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for your comment! You make an interesting point. There are upsides and downsides to every culture, of course. “Helicopter parenting” is a big part of US culture right now. But I think the fact that the teacher let them submit a music video instead of written dialogue (the assignment) probably says something positive about the educational environment – at least in our city. Lots to think about. Thank you!

      Like

  21. I stumbled on to this article by accident but your article grabbed my attention. Once I began to read, I couldn’t stop. Suffice it to say, your words made me stop short. As the mother of one of these boy-men, I could see my son in every paragraph. Once I finished your article, I knew what I needed to do. As I sat on my son’s bed, I told him, “You know I love you, right?” He nodded. “Well, I think you should know I really LIKE you, too. And, as annoying as it is to admit, I think you’re pretty darned funny too.” The smile on his face was all I needed to see. Thank you. They truly are wonderful creatures.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. Reblogged this on betsycalder and commented:
    Anytime an article can snap you to attention, it’s worth noting. I stumbled on to this essay by accident or perhaps it was destined. Portraying teenage years in a positive and humorous light made me realize how lucky I am, how lucky my husband and I are, to be parents to a wonderful young man.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Reblogged this on where we are and commented:
    It is so refreshing to read positive stories about teenagers! Each generation tends to grumble about the “new generation.” And I cringe every time some around me says something to the effect of “kids these days…” (Especially when it comes from someone my age – as if we’re so much older). As a teacher at a large public high school, teenagers amaze me on a daily basis. Yes, every generation is different from the last – but these differences are a launching pad for greatness.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Wow! So let me just say that I am overwhelmed by the response to this post. Thank you all – I mean that, every single parent, teen, teacher, or none of the afore who have commented. I am working on responding to each comment, but life and family and work are preventing a more timely response. Can I just say how much I love, love, love the multi-generational response from all over the world? This is the connection that makes us, the human species, so great. Thank you all!
    P.S. If you are not familiar with Semisonic’s Closing Time, do check it out.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGytDsqkQY8

    Liked by 2 people

  25. I’m 17 and my teen life is good. I’m at a stage where I am really looking forward to my independence. I don’t think teens get enough credit however. I feel like teens don’t get treated like a real person sometimes and just a young adult but we will just like every adult have to have real responsibilities someday just like everyone else. Live, love, life

    Liked by 2 people

  26. I really liked this. Thank you. I worked with teenagers for years, i took up teaching to do this. I have given that up now, but maybe prematurely. I am an adult who will laugh along with ‘those damn teenagers’ in the street. So funny!

    Liked by 2 people

  27. I LOVE my teenager and her friends! I never understood why people dislike them so much. Personally, I think parents truly, for the most part, get back from their teen what they put in….a reaping of what we have sowed.

    Liked by 3 people

  28. clancym1@msn.com

    Yes! I, too, love having a teenage son. He’s so open-minded. I thought he and his buddies might be homophobic, like some teen boys, but they’re not. They’re very accepting of the differences in others. My son is not religious but is very respectable of those who are.

    Liked by 3 people

  29. Thank you for this! My son is turning 14 next week and folks always ask if I miss those younger and baby years. And honestly, I might feel a little nostalgic or wistful but I don’t necessarily wish for them back! I’m enjoying these years and am excited to see what comes next.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. As I self am a 15 year old teenager is it beautiful to hear a mother speak about teens in this way. The support of a parent in this way is more precious than you could ever imagine, to embrace the quirks of the new generation instead of complaining how we’ve lost all the good things from the past. The part about the equality is magnificent, we don’t give a damn about who you fall in love with, how our indifference can be good..Instead of only annoying. to cut this all short, you’re a great mother and I just wanted to TELL you, YOU ROCK! (pardon my English, I’m from the Netherlands)

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Bravo! What a great post. I am lucky enough to have two teenagers myself and everything you said is spot on. I love when they are both home for dinner and can share their days. The people they are becoming constantly amazes me. My children and their friends are so accepting of other people and don’t even notice differences that people of older generations still struggle with. Your description of the eating habits of a group of teenage boys also reminded me of the night we had a team dinner for my son’s HS basketball team! I think I used the term “swarm of locusts” but yours works just as well! Thanks again for a great read!

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Yes! As a mom of four, ages 26, 22, 17 and 8….I agree wholeheartedly that the teenage years yield a new playing field for parent/child relationships—a newfound mutual respect, friendship, and admiration….and although I love my 8 year old more than life itself, I look forward to the teenage years with him, as well. I really enjoyed reading this 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  33. mominthefrontseat

    I too love parenting the tween/teen age. I find these years to be awesome because of the thoughts they have created. Unlike when they were younger and I was still talking for them. This age is magical!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Your teen, your son, sounds wonderful… The part when he played The Script to you made me smile!
    I teach children between the ages of 11-16 and find that so rewarding. Many ask why I don’t teach younger kids or first response is ‘That must be tough!’ But there is something magical about that age… Personally, I love teaching 15/16 year olds. They begin to develop their maturity and to see them sprout into interesting human beings is delightful!
    Good luck with your next teenager, hope he brings you as much happiness and joy!

    Liked by 1 person

  35. At first I was all “really?” This person must not be with a teenager very long. I read on and found myself agreeing with every point. Nice. I lkke this new perspective. While I call ourse the grumpy teenage smurf (check out my blog for the smurf part) I really do enjoy the human she is.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Wonderful text. Being a teacher who works with teenagers, and having a son who has just started knocking on the doors of teenage years, I can relate to so much of what you have said. And generally, we tend to underestimate children all the way. Each age has its magic!

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Thank you for the wonderful reminder of how joyful my teens were. They were such a joy. And the food, I jokingly asked the child protective service worker that I worked with to “Please come and get my children. They are eating me out of house and home. They slop in the house all day, and they always want money.”
    He only replied that he is going to bring me more children.
    And when they get a driver’s license is such a lonely time. They don’t need you to take them to football practice anymore. They are just gone. Yes, teens are wonderful.

    Liked by 2 people

  38. As a teen that’s also a freshman in high school , it’s nice to see a new look on “just wait till you have teens!” Most adults see it as a warning for the bad that’s going to come, and sure there’s a lot of drama and pressure and that’s usually dependable on the child and those who are around them. We don’t change, we just get older and start to see things a little different with our own perspective. Teen years are made for us to learn and grow into adults and figure ourselves out (even though a lot don’t till later own in their life.)
    I really liked your article and the new look you’ve put out there for parents that have young, or preteen children.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. I have 3 teens and one young adult (and a 10 year ole). The time does fly, and I agree that teens are easier than little kids in more ways than one. My guys really do crack me up. I have recently started blogging about them. Wish I had started earlier. Looking forward to reading more.

    Like

  40. I have a 15 year-old daughter, who is a sophomore in high school. To me, she is amazing and her friends are, too. People always talk about teenage girls like it’s all about drama, hating each other and chasing boys. Yes, there is drama; fights with girlfriends or boyfriends or tears over any number of things. But they are also kind, articulate, loving, imaginative and fun. These are the best years!

    Like

  41. carleesj

    The few teens I have meet recently are way ahead I maturity compared to the adults I meet. They are tolerant, open, forgiving, positive, knowledgeable, have a desire to follow their strengths, and know they have more to offer the present generation.

    Like

  42. I loved this. I help raise a pair of twins in the township where I work in Cape Town and I also teach youth here. It gives me so back. I go back and forth to LA though and sometimes I marvel at how different things are in the two countries. How different lives teens live and yet how they are the same. And co-incidentally I just started writing a modern version of Romeo and Juliet to work with here with the teens I teach and cracked a joke about Shakespeare’s dirty humor. 🙂

    Like

  43. Rim

    It’s hard for some parents to understand teenage, it’s good that now mothers can look at it with a better perspective, it just shows that the gap between adults and teens can be closer, with a little bit of positive attitude.

    Like

Everyone has the right to an opinion and I'd love to hear yours! While comments are very welcome, they will be moderated. My kids read this blog, too!

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s